How 3D printing is revolutionising health and nutrition innovation

As CEO and founder of the startup Nourished, launched in 2019, Melissa Snover uses 3D

As CEO and founder of the startup Nourished, launched in 2019, Melissa Snover uses 3D printing tech to create gummy supplements specifically made for customers based on their responses to an online questionnaire.

In a preview to the talk she will give at the summit, Snover describes how the use of technology removes huge barriers to innovation.

“92% of all new product launches fail, so the chances of getting a product to market that works is tiny and this huge risk is clearly a massive barrier to innovation.

“By using 3D technology we can respond to new trends, global economical change in real time with basically no risk.

“We can add new ingredients into our offering in 14 days and create a new product line in less than a month from concept.

“In comparison to the traditional way of manufacturing, this new method is a thousand times faster and the investment cost is negligible.”

Snover explains that in her first startup company ‘Goody Good Stuff’ she made all-natural vegetarian gummy sweets the ‘old-fashioned way’ – in a factory.

“I had to make a minimum order of 100,000 bags per flavour in order for the factory to agree to produce my product which is hugely risky and prohibitive for any small business.

“What’s more, it would take two years to take the product from concept to market with huge amounts of money needing to be invested. It was always a huge risk because if the product failed you had new packaging that would die, production line space taken up, man hours put in, and cash wasted.”