Drug

Lyme disease: Drug could eradicate the bacterium behind illness

Microscopic image of Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria

Cultura Creative RF/Alamy

The discovery that a chemical is deadly to the bacterium that causes Lyme disease but harmless to animals might allow the disease to be eradicated in the wild.

“Lyme disease is well-positioned to be eradicated,” says Kim Lewis at Northeastern University in Boston. “We are gearing up, the first field trial will be next summer.”

Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi that lurks in wild mice. Ticks that feed on the mice become infected and can infect other animals, including people.

The disease

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Drug or Exercise for Geriatric Depression? It Depends

Among older adults with mild-to-moderate depressive disorder diagnosed during a primary care visit, antidepressant medication or supervised group exercise sessions may decrease symptoms to a similar degree during the first month of treatment, a randomized trial shows.

At 3 and 6 months, however, medication may have greater benefit.

Each intervention has its advantages, risks, and limitations and may play a role in clinical practice, researchers said.

The findings suggest that “while exercise by itself may not be as potent as an antidepressant in treating depression, it certainly seems to be a good augmentation strategy to antidepressants,” commented Lauren Gerlach,

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Alzheimer’s disease drug: FDA narrows prescribing information

The FDA approved changing the drug’s label to clarify that the treatment is intended specifically for patients with mild cognitive impairment or milder stages of disease, according to an announcement Thursday from the companies Biogen and Eisai.
“Treatment with Aduhelm should be initiated in patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage of disease, the population in which treatment was initiated in clinical trials. There are no safety or effectiveness data on initiating treatment at earlier or later stages of the disease than were studied,” the new prescribing information states.

Initially, the previous prescribing information for the drug —

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Drug for children with rare disease being discontinued

‘We know it works, we know it helps them’: Drug for children with rare disease being discontinued



LINE AND THE DRUG DELAYING THEIR SYMPTOMS IS BEING TAKEN AWAY. OKAY YOU TV INVESTIGATES IS HIGHLIGHTED THE CONCERNS OF AN OMAHA COUPLE THEIR SON HAS A RARE DISEASE AND WAS SHOWING PROGRESS ON AN EXPERIMENTAL DRUG CALLED ADROBATODEX, BUT THE PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY BEHIND IT SAYS IT’S CLINICAL DATA SHOWS. NO CLEAR EVIDENCE OF POTENTIAL BENEFIT. WELL TONIGHT JAMES WILCOX SHOWS US HOW THIS FAMILY AND A FEW HUNDRED MORE ARE STILL

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AstraZeneca’s diabetes drug Farxiga nabs coveted kidney disease nod, way ahead of rival Jardiance

AstraZeneca’s diabetes med Farxiga stormed the heart failure market with a first-in-class approval last year—and in chronic kidney disease (CKD), it just left would-be rival Jardiance in the dust. 

The FDA late Friday approved Farxiga, also known as dapagliflozin, to treat CKD even in patients without diabetes.

With that CKD approval in hand, Farxiga has cemented its lead against Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim’s SGLT2 rival Jardiance, which isn’t expecting data from its kidney disease outcomes trial until 2022.

Meanwhile, AZ’s drug will contend—at least in part—with Johnson & Johnson’s own SGLT2 challenger, Invokana, which boasts an approval in diabetic

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Experimental Drug Boosts Brain Cell Cleaning to Reverse Alzheimer’s Disease Symptoms

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed an experimental drug that reversed key symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The drug works by reinvigorating a cellular cleaning mechanism—chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA)—that gets rid of unwanted proteins by digesting and recycling them. “Discoveries in mice don’t always translate to humans, especially in Alzheimer’s disease,” said co-study leader Ana Maria Cuervo, MD, PhD, the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases, professor of developmental and molecular biology, and co-director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein. “But we were encouraged to find in our study that

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